Quick Answer: Are there wild snakes in Singapore?

Where can I find snakes in Singapore?

Where: Snakes are often found in the many nature reserves like Sungei Buloh Wetlands and forested green spaces, though reticulated pythons, in particular, are found in drains and canals.

Why are there so many snakes in Singapore?

Due to the urbanisation of the country, snakes are forced back to more natural habitats. The problem is, these are still near buildings and houses. From time to time, snakes turn up on backyards of houses or in city drains.

Does Singapore have Cobras?

Equatorial spitting cobras can still be found in desolated urban areas of Singapore. The bigger king cobra is much rarer. … There are also 2 coral snake and 9 sea snake species.

What to do if you find a snake in Singapore?

What to Do if You Spot a Snake?

  1. Police: 999 (if the snake is a threat to public safety)
  2. Ambulance: 995 (if someone is bitten)
  3. Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA): (1800) 476 1600.
  4. Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (ACRES) Wildlife Rescue Hotline: (+65) 9783 7782.

Are there pythons in Singapore?

Although Singapore has a predominantly urban landscape, the reticulated python – which holds the record for being the world’s longest snake – is one of the most frequently encountered snakes on the island. … Since 2006, the zoo has been conducting a “mark-and-release” project with these rescued pythons.

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How do you keep snakes away from your house in Singapore?

Deter Snakes from Entering Your Property

  1. Trim grass regularly to keep it short.
  2. Keep wood, rock and debris from piling up.
  3. Seal holes that snakes can hide in such as under the sheds, decks and walls.
  4. Place fitting fences or walls around ponds as a deterrent.

Is green snake in Singapore poisonous?

The Oriental Whip Snake (Ahaetulla prasina) is a native species with a striking bright green colour that helps it to camouflage well among the foliage during the daytime when it is most active. … Although it is mildly venomous, the Oriental Whip Snake is usually shy and docile, preferring to stay away from people.