Quick Answer: Which is better Ceylon or Vietnamese cinnamon?

Is Vietnamese cinnamon bad for you?

Saigon cinnamon is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in large amounts for a long period of time. Taking large amounts of Saigon cinnamon may cause liver injury or worsen liver disease due to the chemical coumarin. This might be especially true in people who are sensitive to coumarin.

Which is healthier Saigon or Ceylon cinnamon?

Ceylon cinnamon is healthier than Saigon cinnamon because it has more medically-established health benefits, and negligible levels of a toxic compound that’s high in Saigon cinnamon. Ceylon is called “True” cinnamon for a reason: it provides users with all of the cinnamon benefits without any of the risks.

Why Ceylon cinnamon is so expensive?

Ceylon cinnamon is made from the dried inner bark of a tree native to Sri Lanka. One pound of these quills can cost $27. That’s because it’s difficult and costly to produce. Even some of the most experienced cinnamon peelers can only make a few pounds of quills a day.

Is McCormick cinnamon real cinnamon?

McCormick is real cinnamon

Cinnamon bark is harvested straight from the tree – McCormick provides high quality whole cinnamon which reduces the risk of ingredient addition and contamination during processing and maintains a leading product.

Is Vietnamese cinnamon the same as regular cinnamon?

The strength of the aroma and flavor depends on how much essential oil the bark has. The authors of the study state that Vietnamese cinnamon sticks usually have a higher cinnamaldehyde content than the other varieties of cinnamon, giving them the strongest flavor.

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How much coumarin is in Vietnamese cinnamon?

Saigon cinnamon contains the highest amount of coumarin of all the four Cinnamomum species sold as cinnamon, with one study detecting 6.97 g/kg in an authenticated sample.

Is cinnamon grown in Vietnam?

Vietnam is home to numerous important crops, including rice, coffee, cotton, and spices like pepper, ginger, and cinnamon. Cinnamon, including its closely related cousin Cassia, is grown in several countries, each with its own unique flavor profile.