How is climate change affecting Indonesia?

Is Indonesia vulnerable to climate change?

Indonesia is vulnerable to climate change due to its high population density – especially in coastal areas, and strong dependence on natural resources for income generation and consumption.

What are the environmental changes occurring on the coast of Indonesia?

Massive coral bleaching and warming sea-surface temperatures can lead to widespread loss of coral reefs, and substantial loss of biodiversity, including the fish that many Indonesians rely on for food and livelihoods.

What is the impact of climate change in Indonesia?

Global warming takes its course in Indonesia with surface temperatures increasing from 0.2 to 0.3 of a degree Celsius per decade. This impacts precipitation patterns, causing a wetter climate in Sumatra and Kalimantan but drier seasons in Java, Bali and Nusa Tenggara.

How is Indonesia affected by sea level rise?

How is Indonesia affected by sea level rise? The land under Indonesia’s current capital is sinking at an average rate of 1-15 cm per year, with the rates of sinking unevenly distributed around the city’s districts, from 1cm per year in the south to up to 15cm in the west and 25cm in North Jakarta.

What is Indonesia doing for the environment?

Recognizing the domestic and international importance of its tropical landscape and the people in it, the Indonesian government has made encouraging decisions; it has voluntarily committed to a minimum 26% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 and developed a strategy for land use and forestry emissions, …

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How is the climate in Indonesia?

Indonesia’s climate is largely hot and humid, with rainfall occurring mostly in low-lying areas and mountainous regions experiencing cooler temperatures. The cities of Jakarta, Ujung Padang, Medan, Padang, and Balikpapan have an average minimum temperature of 22.8°C and a high of 30.2°C.

How polluted is Indonesia?

5 concentrations from 8 μg/m3 to 22 μg/m3. According to the AQLI, as 80 percent of Indonesia’s population of over 250 million is exposed to annual average pollution concentrations above the WHO guideline, the country has the fifth highest loss of life-years due to particulate pollution in the world.