Question: How many Thai dialects are there?

What are the different dialects of Thai?

Two major dialects of Thais, the national language, are spoken in Thailand: Central Thai and Southern Thai. Northern Thai is spoken in the northern provinces that were formerly part of the independent kingdom of Lan Na while Isan, a Lao dialect, is the native language of the northeast.

Is Tai and Thai language same?

As a linguistic and historical term, ‘Tai’ refers to a branch of the Tai-Kadai family, while ‘Thai‘ refers specifically to the language of Thailand. Widespread as the Tai-Kadai family is, only two languages have official status as national languages: Thai in Thailand and Lao in Laos.

Which major languages are dying?

8 Endangered Languages That Could Soon Disappear

  • Irish Gaelic. Irish Gaelic currently has over 40,000 estimated native speakers. …
  • Krymchak. Also spelled Krimchak and known as Judeo-Crimean Tatar, this language is spoken by people in Crimea, a peninsula of Ukraine. …
  • Okanagan-Colville. …
  • Ts’ixa. …
  • Ainu. …
  • Rapa Nui. …
  • Yagan.

What is considered a dying language?

A dead language is one which has no remaining native speakers. Dying languages are considered endangered through various tiers relating to how widely they’re spoken and whether the remaining speakers are older or younger.

Is English widely spoken in Thailand?

The main language spoken in Thailand is Thai. … English is the most common second language, and many Thais have studied some level of English either at school or through practice with foreign friends.

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What are the four main dialects of Thailand?

Within Thailand, there are four major dialects, corresponding to the southern, northern (“Yuan”), north-eastern (close to Lao language), and central regions of the country; the latter is called Central Thai or Bangkok Thai and is taught in all schools, is used for most television broadcasts, and is widely understood in …

Is Thai similar to Chinese?

They’re both tonal languages, but they’re not in the same language family, despite what linguists tended to believe some 15 years ago. Thai belongs to the Kra-Dai language family and has 5 tones. Mandarin is related to the Sino-Tibetan language family, and the Chinese uses 4 tones.